WHAT WE BELIEVE

At the Congregational Church of Middlebury, UCC you will find a community of individuals with diverse backgrounds and beliefs doing our best to practice the teachings of Jesus as we understand them. You are invited to join us as we learn to love and follow Jesus and grow deeper in faith.


All are welcome to join us on our journey of faith.  As a loving and caring faith community, we recognize that we are one body in Christ. 


We welcome and respect all people of any race, gender, nationality, ethnic origin, physical or mental ability, sexual orientation, and gender expression.


We are a self-governing community of faith in covenant with the United Church of Christ, active in the local and global mission of the church. It is our aim to offer welcoming hospitality to all. Our belief in the one God of love compels us to embrace one another, people from other Christian denominations, followers of other faiths, and individuals who do not identify as religious at all. Our goal is to see Christ in every human being and to value each person as an individual. We endeavor to love each other as God loves us.


Read our complete Covenant

Read our current Bylaws

the united church of christ

The Congregational Church in Middlebury, Vermont is part of denomination called the United Church of Christ (UCC), founded in 1957, but made up of churches that have been around a lot longer than that, going back to the first Pilgrims in America in 1620.

The UCC is known for its welcoming stance toward all people. You can see that goes back a long way when you read the list of the things we did first. Ours was the first historically white denomination to ordain an African-American (in the 18th century), the first in the modern era to ordain a woman (in the 19th century), and the first to ordain an openly gay man (in the 20th century).


We were in the forefront of the anti-slavery movement. We founded the first institutions of higher learning in America (Harvard, Yale) and were among the first to establish schools and colleges for newly freed slaves (Fisk, Dillard). We were early leaders in the Social Gospel movement, taking seriously Jesus’ commandment to “love your neighbor as yourself.” We brought to North America the concept of freedom of the press. Today, the Pilgrim Press is the oldest publishing house in the U.S.